How To Move a Shed By Hand

How to move a shed by hand is fairly easy if you have the right equipment and use the proper technique. This technique can be used to move a shed anywhere from 4×6 up to 12×24 in size.

Other Options

Of course the easiest way to move a shed is with a crane or forklift. But since you probably don’t have either of these at your disposal I’ll show you a low tech way to do it with common household items.

Gather the necessary equipment

move a shed pipe rollers

A few pipe rollers, wood tracks and any auto jack is all you need

A few pipe rollers, wood tracks and any auto jack is all you’ll need. These are pretty common items so you can probably borrow anything you don’t already have.

  • For a jack, a Hi-lift jack is the best. A hydraulic floor jack is the next best, but a scissor jack or bottle jack or ultimately any car jack will do.
  • You’ll also need a few wood or concrete blocks to keep the shed up in the air while you’re manipulating the tracks and rollers underneath.
  • You’ll need at least 3 heavy pipe rollers. I prefer 2 to 2 ½ inch water pipe but some people use 4 to 6 inch PVC pipe.
  • And finally you’ll need at least 4 wood tracks of 2×4, 2×6, 4×4 etc. Whether you need these depends on what type of pipes you’re using and if the ground is smooth and hard enough for the pipes to roll easily.

Your new site

  • Select your new site with proper drainage, security and ease of access in mind
  • Prepare the new site by removing any debris, level it and make your foundation if necessary
  • Clear a route from the old location to the new location paying particular attention to any overhead obstacle like wires, tree branches and the eaves of the house.

Prepare the shed

  • Empty your shed of any heavy items. It will be ok to leave the bulky and light stuff in.
  • Strengthen the shed if necessary with cross bracing, depending on the construction and if it has any windows that might break. However you should have few if any problems moving a sturdy shed.

Now you are ready to actually move your shed

Place the pipes between the skids and tracks, lower the shed down and push to move…

how to move a shed 1

Jack the back end of the shed up at least as high as the rollers and wood tracks combined, then block it up in place.

When I say the back end of the shed I mean the end of the shed away from the direction of travel.

how to move a shed 2Jack the front end of the shed up high enough to work easily.
how to move a shed 3Lay the wood tracks down on the ground underneath the skids extending past the center of the shed.
how to move a shed 4Lay a roller near the front of the shed and one just behind the center of the shed.
how to move a shed 5Sit the front end of the shed down on the rollers, then remove the blocks and set the back end of the shed down.
how to move a shed 6

Now all you have to do is to push the shed in the direction you want it to travel.

As the shed moves forward you will have to keep replacing the roller pipes, bringing the free roller from the rear around to the front as the shed moves off the back one.

As you run out of track place another set overlapping the original so the rollers will not fall into a crack between the ends.

Change Direction

If you want to change direction just spin the shed on the pipes by putting a person on either corner and spin. Then jack the shed up again – reposition the pipes and tracks – lower it down and push in the new direction.

When it’s in place

  • Block and level
  • Maybe add tie down if necessary and you are done
  • Reload your stuff
  • Return any borrowed items and thank your friends for helping you.

As you can see, how to move a shed by hand is fairly easy. The tools you need are common and the technique is simple.

In case you decide to build a new shed…

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  • These plans have been written in great detail specifically for you – the first time shed builder
3 column top

Includes dimensions for 45 shed sizes

3 column top

Option for a full size porch

  • 1.5/12 roof pitch
  • 2, 4-6, 12 inch overhang options
  • 45 sizes from 4×4 to 12×20
  • 4 height options from 60 inches to 12 ft
  • Any custom length, width or height
  • Single and double doors
  • Floor studs 16 inch O.C.
  • Wall studs 16 inch O.C.
  • Rafters 16 inch O.C.
  • Single top plates
  • Instructions and details to build a porch
  • Bike shed ideas
  • Frame for pre hung doors and windows

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3 column top

Includes 3/12, 4/12 & 5/12 roof pitches

3 column top

  • 3/12, 4/12, 5/12 roof pitch options
  • 2, 3 1/2, 5 1/2 inch overhang
  • 21 sizes from 8×4 to 12×20
  • Single and double doors
  • Single top plates
  • Wall studs and roof trusses 24 inch O.C.
  • One of the cheapest and easiest to build

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3 column top

Includes 3/12, 6/12 & 12/12 roof pitches with full 12 inch overhang

3 column top

  • 3/12, 6/12 and 12/12 roof pitch options
  • 12 inch overhang
  • 31 sizes from 8×4 to 16×32
  • 8, 10, 12, 14 & 16 ft widths
  • Single and double doors
  • Floor studs 12 inch O.C.
  • Wall studs 16 inch O.C.
  • Roof trusses 16 inch O.C.
  • Double top plates
  • Includes 48 inch loft the length of the shed with an optional gable end door
  • Frame for pre hung doors and windows

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3 column top

Updated to include:
10 Larger sizes,
Overhang &
Crows Beak
Original
Also includes original version without overhang

  • Gambrel style barn roof
  • 12 inch overhang (option)
  • 31 sizes from 8×4 to 16×32
  • 8, 10, 12, 14 & 16 ft widths
  • Crows Beak (option)
  • Single and double doors
  • Floor studs 12 inch O.C.
  • Wall studs 16 inch O.C.
  • Roof trusses 16
    or 24 inch O.C.
  • Double top plates
  • Includes full width loft
  • Frame for pre hung doors and windows

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“Just wanted to compliment you on your plans and videos. I’m about half way thru and things are working out very well. Everything has been very straight forward. Would have been much harder without your plans and instruction. Thanks so much.”

“Thanks for your shed plans. I think I looked at every major plan outlet online and otherwise and I found your plans to be the most straightforward, easy to read and use, and easy to customize without fuss. I was worried with the name cheapsheds.com, but this shed I’m building from your plans is anything but cheap and I’m certain it will last the better part of the next 30 years. Great job on these plans.”

“I liked your plans and it made building a nice shed much easier. Keep up the good work.”

Includes Dimensions For All These Sizes

4×4 – 4×20
6×4 – 6×20
8×4 – 8×20 8×4 – 8×16 8×4 – 8×16 8×4 – 8×16
10×4 – 10×20 10×8 – 10×20 10×8 – 10×20 10×8 – 10×20
12×4 – 12×20 12×8 – 12×20 12×8 – 12×20 12×8 – 12×20
14×16 – 14×32 14×16 – 14×32
16×16 – 16×32 16×16 – 16×32

Features Of These Sheds

Similarities:
  • Floor covering: 3/4 inch plywood
  • Foundation: Pressure treated skids, concrete slab or floor less foundation
  • Wall materials: 4×8 sheets of hardboard siding or T-111
  • Door style: Out swinging shed door
  • Door location: Can be located any where on any wall
  • Door options: Single door, double door, wider or narrower door
  • Door options: Frame for pre-hung doors and windows
Differences:
  • Roof line: Single slope lean-to style
  • Roof pitch: 1.5/12
  • Roof covering: Rolled or metal
  • Overhang: 1-6 inch or 12 inch
  • Roof structure: 2×4 or 2×6 rafters
  • Floor joists: (8 wide) 2×4 at 16 inch O.C. (10/12 wide) 2×6 at 16 inch O.C.
  • Wall stud spacing: 2×4 at 16 inch O.C.
  • Wall framing: Single top and bottom plates with double corner studs
  • Roof line: Gable
  • Roof pitch: 3/12, 4/12, 5/12
  • Roof covering: Asphalt shingles
  • Roof structure: 2×4 trusses
  • Overhang: 2, 3 1/2, 5 1/2 inch
  • Floor joists: (8 wide) 2×4 at 16 inch O.C. (10/12 wide) 2×6 at 16 inch O.C.
  • Wall stud spacing: 2×4 at 24 inch O.C.
  • Wall framing: Single top and bottom plates with double corner studs
  • Roof line: Gable
  • Roof pitch: 6/12 or 12/12
  • Roof covering: Asphalt shingles
  • Roof structure: 2×4 trusses
  • Overhang: About 12 inchs
  • Floor joists: 2×6 at 12 inch O.C.
  • Wall stud spacing: 2×4 at 16 inch O.C.
  • Wall framing: Double top and single bottom plates with double corner studs
  • Roof line: Gambrel (barn style)
  • Roof pitch: Combination of 29/12 lower section, 4/12 upper section
  • Roof covering: Asphalt shingles
  • Roof structure: 2×4 trusses
  • Overhang: About 12 inches
  • Floor joists: 2×6 at 12 inch O.C.
  • Wall stud spacing: 2×4 at 16 inch O.C.
  • Wall framing: Double top and single bottom plates with double corner studs
General notes:

The biggest difference between these shed plans is the roof line. All sheds can be built with roof trusses and wall studs 16 or 24 inch O.C. and floor joists 12 or 16 inch O.C. and use 2 to 5 skids in the foundation. All of the sheds can be built taller or shorter and doors installed anywhere you like.

These are the most versatile plans because they offer so many size and height options.

And it has a low profile with no complicated trusses to build.

This is one of the easiest sheds to build because it uses a simple truss design and small but easy to build overhang options.

These sheds look great!

And the higher roof pitches offer additional overhead storage in an easy to build loft area.

The barn style shed is very tall and might block yours or your neighbors views.

However if you can manage the barn style shed looks great and provides lots of additional storage if you build the optional loft.

Dimensions

Overall outside height at peak, not including foundation. For foundation add 4″ for skids and 2″ to 4″ for concrete blocks.
Lowest profile option

  • 60 inches or less

Medium height option

  • All widths: 8′

Tall option

  • 6 ft wide: 9′ 2″
  • 8 ft wide: 9′ 5″
  • 10 ft wide: 9′ 10″
  • 12 ft wide: 10′ 1″

Extra tall option

  • Up to 12′ with 10′ minimum wall height
Standard 3/12 pitch

  • 8 ft wide: 8′
  • 10 ft wide: 8′ 3″
  • 12 ft wide: 8′ 6″

Standard 7ft sidewall height

  • 8 ft wide: 9′
  • 10 ft wide: 9′ 3″
  • 12 ft wide: 9′ 6″

Optional 8ft sidewall height
You can make this shed shorter if necessary by removing the same amount from all vertical cut dimensions.

12/12 pitch

  • 8 ft wide: 12′
  • 10 ft wide: 13′
  • 12 ft wide: 14′
  • 14 ft wide: 15′
  • 16 ft wide: 16′

6/12 pitch

  • 8 ft wide: 10′
  • 10 ft wide: 10.5′
  • 12 ft wide: 11′
  • 14 ft wide: 11.5′
  • 16 ft wide: 12′

These dimensions are for standard 8ft side wall height using optimal stud length.

  • 8 ft wide: 12′
  • 10 ft wide: 13′
  • 12 ft wide: 14′

These dimensions are for standard 8ft side wall height using optimal stud length.

Minimum inside wall height (headroom) under end of truss or rafter
Lowest profile option

  • 46 inches

Medium height option

  • 4 ft wide: 82-86″ *
  • 6 ft wide: 79-83″ *
  • 8 ft wide: 76-80″ *
  • 10 ft wide: 69-75″ *
  • 12 ft wide: 66-72″ *

* Depending on overhang option

Tall option

  • 4, 6 & 8 ft wide: 92″
  • 10 & 12 wide: 90″

Extra tall option

  • All widths: 9′ 4″ or more

Add 3 to 5 inches if you build on a concrete slab.

  • 76 1/2″ for standard 7ft side wall height
  • 88 1/2″ for optional 8ft side wall height

Add 3 to 5 inches if you build on a concrete slab.

  • 90″ for optimal side wall height
  • 95″ for maximum side wall height

Add 3 to 5 inches if you build on a concrete slab.

  • 90″ for optimal side wall height
  • 95″ for maximum side wall height

Add 3 to 5 inches if you build on a concrete slab.

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3 column middle

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3 column middle

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3 column middle

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3 column middle

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Can’t Decide?
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Table of contents

Step by step instructions
  • General notes
  • Step 1: Foundation
  • Step 2: Floor, wood
  • Step 2a: Floor, concrete
  • Step 3: Sloped walls
  • Step 4: Tall and short walls
  • Step 5a: Prehung doors and windows
  • Step 5b: Single shed door
  • Step 5c: Double shed door
  • Step 5d: Open the shed door
  • Step 6: Frame and sheet the roof
  • Step 7: Trim
  • Step 8: Roof covering
  • Step 9: Paint and maintenance
  • Build a porch
  • Build a ramp
  • Bike sheds
  • How to contact me
  • Videos
  • Getting Started
  • Step 1: Foundation
  • Step 2: Floor
  • Step 3: Trusses
  • Step 4: Frame Walls
  • Step 5: Frame Door
  • Step 6: Raise Walls
  • Step 7: Finish Door
  • Step 8: Frame Roof
  • Step 9: Trim
  • Step 10: Shingle Roof
  • Maintenance
  • Build a ramp
  • How To Contact Me
  • General notes
  • Step 1: Foundation
  • Step 2: Floor, wood
  • Step 2a: Floor, concrete
  • Step 3: Trusses
  • Step 4: Walls
  • Step 5a: Prehung doors and windows
  • Step 5b: Single shed door
  • Step 5c: Double shed door
  • Step 5d: Open the shed door
  • Step 6: Frame and sheet the roof
  • Step 7: Trim
  • Step 8: Shingle the Roof
  • Step 9: Paint and maintenance
  • Build a loft
  • Build a ramp
  • How to contact me
  • General notes
  • Step 1: Foundation
  • Step 2: Floor, wood
  • Step 2a: Floor, concrete
  • Step 3: Trusses
  • Step 3a: Adding overhang
  • Step 3b: Adding a crows beak
  • Step 4: Walls
  • Step 5a: Prehung doors and windows
  • Step 5b: Single shed door
  • Step 5c: Double shed door
  • Step 5d: Open the shed door
  • Step 6: Frame and sheet the roof
  • Step 7: Trim
  • Step 8: Shingle the Roof
  • Step 9: Paint and maintenance
  • Build a loft
  • Build a ramp
  • How to contact me
Dimensions and Quantities Tables
  • Table 1: Materials list and cost estimate worksheet
  • Table 1: Notes
  • Table 2a: Dimensions that vary with the length and width of the shed
  • Table 2a: Notes
  • Table 2b: Dimensions that vary with the height and overhang
  • Table 2b: Notes
  • Table 3: Number of pieces to cut
  • Table 4: Nailing Schedule
  • Table 5: Fraction to decimal converter
  • Table 1: Materials list and cost estimate worksheet
  • Table 2: Dimensions that vary with the length and width of the shed
  • Table 3: Number of pieces to cut
  • Table 1: Materials list and cost estimate worksheet for 8×4 through 12×20
  • Table 1a: Materials list and cost estimate worksheet for 14×16 through 16×32
  • Table 1: Notes
  • Table 1a: Notes
  • Table 2: Dimensions that vary with the length and width of the shed
  • Table 2: Notes
  • Table 3: Number of pieces to cut
  • Table 4: Nailing Schedule
  • Table 5: Truss dimensions 6/12 & 12/12 pitch
  • Table 5: Notes
  • Table 1: Materials list and cost estimate worksheet
  • Table 2: Dimensions that vary with the length and width of the shed
  • Table 3: Number of pieces to cut
  • Table 4: Nailing Schedule
Building Details and Figures
  • Figure 1.1, Skid spacing
  • Figure 1.2, Concrete block spacing
  • Figure 2.1, Floor dimensions
  • Figure 2.2, Rim joist splice for floor over 20ft
  • Figure 2.3, Floor frame complete
  • Figure 3.1, Sloped wall dimensions
  • Figure 3.2, Tall wall dimensions
  • Figure 3.3, Short wall dimensions
  • Figure 3.4, Rafter cut template
  • Figure 3.5, Wall framing diagram
  • Figure 3.6, Sloped wall framing layout for 6 & 10 ft wide sheds
  • Figure 3.7, Sloped wall framing layout for 4, 8 & 12 ft wide sheds
  • Figure 4.1, Tall and short wall framing layout for 6, 10, 14 & 18 ft length sheds
  • Figure 4.2, Tall and short wall framing layout for 4, 8, 12, 16 & 20 ft length sheds
  • Figure 4.3, Top plate spacing detail for tall and short walls
  • Figure 4.4, Blocking required for sheds that are 8 ft or more at the short wall
  • Figure 5a, Frame for prehung doors and windows
  • Figure 5b.1, Outer door frame
  • Figure 5b.2, Inner door frame
  • Figure 5b.3, Complete single door frame
  • Figure 5b.4, Nailing sequence
  • Figure 5b.5, Chalk lines, cut lines
  • Figure 5b.6, Inner door trim
  • Figure 5b.7, Complete door trim showing 7/16 inch gap between inner and outer trim
  • Figure 5c.1, Inner door uprights, siding breaks, and cripple stud spacing
  • Figure 5c.2, Inner door spacers and uprights
  • Figure 5c.3, Door trim spacing and underlying cut lines
  • Figure 5c.4, Complete door trim
  • Figure 6.1, 1-6 inch overhang combinations
  • Figure 6.2, Full overhang combinations
  • Figure 6.3, 1-6 inch overhang detail before trim boards
  • Figure 6.4, Side view 1-2 inch overhang details
  • Figure 6.5, Side view 4-6 inch overhang with trim boards
  • Figure 6.6, Full overhang detail
  • Figure 6.7, Full overhang showing bird boards between rafters
  • Figure 6.8, Full overhang top view
  • Figure 6.9, Full overhang showing rafter support cut-outs and spacing
  • Figure 7.1, Porch side view
  • Figure 7.2, Porch components
  • Figure 7.3, Porch front view
  • Figure 8.1, Compact vertical bike shed
  • Figure 8.2, Interior dimensions of my original compact bike shed
  • Figure 8.3, Free standing 4×8 vertical bike shed
  • Figure 8.4, Flush fit 4×8 vertical bike shed
  • Figure 8.5, Interior dimensions for a 4×8 vertical bike shed
  • Figure 8.6, Top view showing clearance and fit for large bikes
  • Figure 8.7, 4×8 Gable roof vertical bike shed
  • Figure 8.8, Low profile bike shed
  • Figure 8.9, End view and trim details
  • Figure 8.10, Small door framing details
  • Figure 8.11, Interior dimensions for 96 inch long low profile bike shed
  • Figure 8.12, Interior dimensions for 72 inch long low profile bike shed
  • Figure 1: Detailed view of framing
  • Figure 2: Floor dimensions and layout
  • Figure 3: Simple jig, truss components
  • Figure 4a: Gable end wall layout showing stud spacing and bottom siding overhang
  • Figure 4b: Front cross section showing 14 degree angle on sidewall studs
  • Figure 4c: sidewall stud spacer detail
  • Figure 4d: Sidewall layout showing stud spacing and siding overhang
  • Figure 5a: Outer door frame including sandwiched header
  • Figure 5b: Inner door frame
  • Figure 5c: Nailing sequence
  • Figure 5d: Chalk lines
  • Figure 5e: Complete door trim showing 7/16 inch gap between inner and outer door trim
  • Figure 6: Wall dimensions and layout
  • Figure 7: First router cut
  • Figure 8: Sidewall cross section with truss layout
  • Figure 8a: Sidewall cross section with optional overhang
  • Figure 9: Trim
  • Figure 1.1, Skid spacing
  • Figure 1.2, Concrete block spacing
  • Figure 2.1, Floor dimensions
  • Figure 2.2, Rim joist splice for floor over 20ft
  • Figure 2.3, Floor frame complete
  • Figure 3.1, Truss dimensions
  • Figure 3.2, Truss jig
  • Figure 3.3, Extra braces for 14 & 16 wide trusses
  • Figure 3.4, Finished truss comparison… 6/12 vs 12/12 pitch
  • Figure 3.5, Gable end blocking
  • Figure 3.6, Frame a loft door into the gable end
  • Figure 3.7, Template for 6/12 pitch
  • Figure 4.1, Wall dimensions
  • Figure 4.2, Wall layout
  • Figure 4.3, End wall framing
  • Figure 4.4, Side wall framing
  • Figure 5a, Frame for prehung doors and windows
  • Figure 5b.1, Outer door frame
  • Figure 5b.2, Inner door frame
  • Figure 5b.3, Complete single door frame
  • Figure 5b.4, Nailing sequence
  • Figure 5b.5, Chalk lines, cut lines
  • Figure 5b.6, Inner door trim
  • Figure 5b.7, Complete door trim showing 7/16 inch gap between inner and outer trim
  • Figure 5c.1, Inner door uprights, siding breaks, and cripple stud spacing
  • Figure 5c.2, Inner door spacers and uprights
  • Figure 5c.3, Door trim spacing and underlying cut lines
  • Figure 5c.4, Complete door trim
  • Figure 8.1, Roof framing details
  • Figure 1.1, Skid spacing
  • Figure 1.2, Concrete block spacing
  • Figure 2.1, Floor dimensions
  • Figure 2.2, Rim joist splice for floor over 20ft
  • Figure 2.3, Floor frame complete
  • Figure 3.1, Truss dimensions
  • Figure 3.2, Truss jig
  • Figure 3.3, Gambrel end framing
  • Figure 3.4, Overhang details
  • Figure 3.5, Truss comparison
  • Figure 3.6, Crows beak dimensions
  • Figure 3.7, Crows beak framing detail
  • Figure 3.8, Crows beak sheeting detail
  • Figure 4.1, Wall dimensions
  • Figure 4.2, Wall layout
  • Figure 4.3, End wall framing
  • Figure 4.4, Side wall framing
  • Figure 5a, Frame for prehung doors and windows
  • Figure 5b.1, Outer door frame
  • Figure 5b.2, Inner door frame
  • Figure 5b.3, Complete single door frame
  • Figure 5b.4, Nailing sequence
  • Figure 5b.5, Chalk lines, cut lines
  • Figure 5b.6, Inner door trim
  • Figure 5b.7, Complete door trim showing 7/16 inch gap between inner and outer trim
  • Figure 5c.1, Inner door uprights, siding breaks, and cripple stud spacing
  • Figure 5c.2, Inner door spacers and uprights
  • Figure 5c.3, Door trim spacing and underlying cut lines
  • Figure 5c.4, Complete door trim
  • Figure 8.1, Roof framing details
Detailed Dimensions Diagrams
  • 4 ft wide, 60 inch (tall) wall height, 1-6 inch overhang
  • 4 ft wide, 72 inch (tall) wall height, 1-6 inch overhang
  • 4 ft wide, 8 ft (tall) wall height, 1-6 inch overhang
  • 4 ft wide, 8 ft (tall) wall height, full overhang
  • 6 ft wide, 72 inch (tall) wall height, 1-6 inch overhang
  • 6 ft wide, 8 ft (tall) wall height, 1-6 inch overhang
  • 6 ft wide, 8 ft (tall) wall height, full overhang
  • 6 ft wide, 8 ft (short) wall height, full overhang
  • 8 ft wide, 8 ft (tall) wall height, 1-6 inch overhang
  • 8 ft wide, 8 ft (tall) wall height, full overhang
  • 8 ft wide, 8 ft (short) wall height, full overhang
  • 10 ft wide, 8 ft (tall) wall height, 1-6 inch overhang
  • 10 ft wide, 8 ft (tall) wall height, full overhang
  • 10 ft wide, 8 ft (short) wall height, full overhang
  • 10 ft wide, 10 ft (short) wall height, full overhang
  • 12 ft wide, 8 ft (tall) wall height, 1-6 inch overhang
  • 12 ft wide, 8 ft (tall) wall height, full overhang
  • 12 ft wide, 8 ft (short) wall height, full overhang
  • 12 ft wide, 10 ft (short) wall height, full overhang
Options
  • Foundation for building a shed without a floor
  • Build on a concrete slab
  • Single or double shed doors
  • Frame for pre hung doors and windows
  • Attached porch
  • Customize your overhang dimensions
  • Screened eave ventilation
  • Foundation for building a shed without a floor
  • Build on a concrete slab
  • Single and double doors
  • 3/12, 4/12 and 5/12 roof pitch
  • 7 or 8ft side wall height
  • 2, 3 1/2 or 5 1/2 inch overhang
  • Foundation for building a shed without a floor
  • Build on a concrete slab
  • Single or double shed doors
  • Frame for pre hung doors and windows
  • 4 ft wide loft
  • 6/12 or 12/12 roof pitch
  • Customize your overhang dimensions
  • Screened eave ventilation
  • Foundation for building a shed without a floor
  • Build on a concrete slab
  • 12 Inch (custom) overhang on all 4 sides
  • (Decorative) Crows Beak
  • Single or double shed doors
  • Frame for pre hung doors and windows
  • Full width loft
  • Screened eave ventilation
Total page count
Over 150 pages Over 100 pages Over 100 pages Over 100 pages

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3 column middle

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3 column bottom

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3 column bottom

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Can’t decide?
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Which Plans Should You Buy For Your New Shed Project?

Are you thinking about buying some shed plans but are confused and don’t know which ones to buy?

I will explain the similarities and difference between my 4 shed plans to help you in deciding which one is best for your new shed project.

The Main Differences Between These Plans Are

  • Roof line
  • Roof pitch
  • Roofing materials used
  • Eave overhang
  • Maximum length & width
  • And the degree of difficulty to build

Roof Line

The most obvious difference in these plans is the roof lines. 2 of the plans are gable style roof, 1 is barn style or gambrel roof line and one is the single slope, lean-to style or flat roof.

Roof Pitch

The regular gable shed plans have 3 roof pitch options; 3:12, 4:12 and 5:12. The deluxe shed plans also have 3 roof pitch options of 3:12, 6:12 and 12:12. So the deluxe plans are good if you need a steep pitch for snow or leave fall off.

The barn roof pitch is fixed for the upper and lower half of the roof. The lean style roof is fixed at 1.5:12. So it’s good in low clearance situations or where the overall heigh is an issue.

Roof Materials

All the shed plans except the lean to style use shingles on the roof. The advantage of shingles is that they’re relatively easy to install, economical and come in a wide variety of colors and textures and have a lifespan of up to 30 years. And you can easily match the roof on your home if necessary.

The lean to style sheds have too shallow of a roof pitch for shingles so they use either rolled mineral roofing or metal. Metal is a little more expensive but it’s fast and easy to install and has a life span of 50+ years.

Eave Overhang

There are 2 types of eave overhangs available in these plans. The simple 2-6 inch overhang and the full 12+ inch overhang. The 2 inch overhang is just the trim and a small overhang on the OSB. The 4 to 6 inch version is a 2×4 or 2×6 turned on edge.

The regular gable roof plans only offer the simple 2-6 inch overhang but the lean to and barn plans can be build with the either the 2-6 inch overhang or a full 12 inch overhang. The deluxe shed plans only offer the full 12 inch overhang.

Maximum Length

With the regular gable and the lean to style plans the longest shed you can build is 20 ft. This is because they use a single top plate and 20 feet is the longest 2×4 you can buy. And with the single top plate it can’t be spliced to make longer. If you want a shed thats over 20 ft long then you can use either the tall barn style plans or the deluxe plans. Both of these can go up to 32 ft in length. But you can make it as long as you like.

Maximum Width

The gable roof and lean to style plans are limited to 12 ft in width because they use a simple truss or rafter design. If you want to build over 12 ft wide then the tall barn and deluxe plans go up to 16 ft in width because they use a stronger but more complicated truss design.

Degree Of Difficulty To Build

The regular gable roof shed plans are the easiest and most economical to build because the walls are symmetrical and there are no complicated trusses to build or fancy overhang options. Trusses and overhang can are very time consuming in the shed building process.

The lean to sheds aren’t symmetrical but the rafters are strait without any cut outs and you can build it with either the simple 2-6 inch overhang or the more complicated full 12+ inch overhang.

Barn style trusses are easy to build but the added difficulty is working on the roof because of the increased pitch and greater overall working height. But you can build it with either overhang option.

The Deluxe shed is the most difficult to build because it doesn’t offer the simple overhang option, only the full 12 inch overhang. And the the trusses are more complicated because of the increased pitch and the 14 and 16 ft width options. And like the tall barn style shed, working on the deluxe roof is more difficult because of the steeper pitch and greater overall working height.

What They Have In Common

Now lets talk about what the plans have in common.

  • Floor
  • Wall Stud And Truss Spacing
  • Doors
  • Ramp
  • Estimate Cost To Build
  • Instant Download

Floor

All of the sheds can be built on either a wood floor or concrete slab. For wood floors I have recommend 2×4’s at 16 inch on center for floors up to 8 ft wide, and 2×6’s 16 inch on center for floor over 8 ft wide. But you can make a stronger floor by using 12 inch centers and or 2×8’s floor joists.

Wall Stud And Truss Spacing

I recommend 2×4’s at 16 inch on center in the walls but you can use 24 inch centers for smaller sheds. I recommend trusses and rafters to be placed at 24 inch on center for sheds up to 12 ft wide, and 16 inch centers for sheds over 12 ft wide.

Doors

All sheds include instructions to frame for prehung doors and windows, or to build your own single or double door in any width or height and in any location, or build multiple doors.

Ramp

All plans include instructions to build a ramp.

Estimate Cost To Build

All plans come with a materials list so you can calculate the cost to build it before you make that final commitment and start buying materials.

Instant Download

All plans are available in PDF format by instant download. When you click on the buy-now link you’ll be taken to a payment page. After paying you will almost instantly receive a download link in the email address associated with your paypal account or your credit card.

How Does The Download Process Work?

  • Within seconds of your purchase a download link will be sent to the email address associated with your PayPal account.
  • When you click on that link it will take you to a very simple page that says to “click here to download shed plans”.
  • When you click on the link it will open a download window. The window will give you the option to save or to open the file.
  • Click the save option and download the plans to your hard drive.
  • Then open the file with an PDF viewer. If you need a free PDF viewer you can find one here.

Sometimes your email and your browsers will not work properly together so you will have to cut the link from the email and paste it into a browser. That solves most of the issues.

But remember where you download the plans otherwise you will not be able to find them on your computer when you need them. Most people use the default download folder.

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